Office Key Remover to Clear and Change Office XP/2003/2007/2010 Product Key

     

When a product key is entered into a Office productivity suite to activate the Office XP, Office 2003, Office 2007 or Office 2010 software, the license information is kept hidden from view, and end-user has no easy way to change the product key without having to mess with registry key.

If you decide to reset or change the product key of Office productivity suite, but do not want to hack the registry to remove the registration license information, Office Key Remover can come to help.

Office Key Remover to Reset Product Key

Office Key Remover is a small tool which removes Microsoft Office’s license information on the Office product that is installed on the system. The license information that is removed include product key and activation status. By removing the license information, Office will ask for a new product key in order to activate Office again, indirectly allow users to change the license key of Microsoft Office.

Download Office Key Remover (version 1.0.0.4): OfficeKeyRemover1.0.0.4-Setup.zip

Latest version, if available, can be found from Google Sites.

Here’s how to use Office Key Remover:

  1. Run Office Key Remover.
  2. Choose the version of Office which license data you want to be removed.
  3. Start one of the Office products.
  4. Enter another product key once you’re asked.

You may need to run Office Key Remover as administrator in order for it to work properly. Office Key Remover supports Office XP, Office 2003, Office 2007 and Office 2010 currently. It requires Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 (or higher versions).

Microsoft warns of Windows shortcut drive-by attacks

Microsoft on Tuesday said that hackers could exploit the unpatched Windows shortcut vulnerability using drive-by download attacks that would trigger an infection when people simply surf to a malicious Web site.

A noted vulnerability researcher today confirmed that such attacks are possible.

In the revised security advisory published yesterday Microsoft acknowledged the new attack vector.

“An attacker could also set up a malicious Web site or a remote network share and place the malicious components on this remote location,” the company said in the advisory. “When the user browses the Web site using a Web browser such as Internet Explorer or a file manager such as Windows Explorer, Windows will attempt to load the icon of the shortcut file, and the malicious binary will be invoked.”

That language was a change from earlier statements by Microsoft, which had said that attackers could hijack Windows PC by setting up a remote network share, a much more complicated task than building a malware-spreading Web site. In the earlier advisory, Microsoft also said that “the malicious binary maybe invoked; the most recent warning instead said “the malicious binary will be invoked [emphasis added in both cases].

Last Friday, Microsoft confirmed that Windows contained a flaw in the parsing of shortcut files, the small files displayed by icons on the desktop, on the toolbar and in the Start menu that launch applications and documents when clicked. By crafting malicious shortcuts, hackers could automatically execute malware whenever a user viewed the shortcut or the contents of a folder containing the malevolent shortcut.

All versions of Windows are at risk, including the recently retired-from-support Windows XP SP2 and Windows 2000.

So far, attacks exploiting the bug appear to be limited to targeted assaults against software that manages large-scale industrial control systems in major manufacturing and utility companies. Siemens AG has confirmed that one of its customers, a German manufacturer it declined to name, had been victimized by an attack exploiting the shortcut bug.

If drive-by attacks can be launched using the vulnerability, it will be relatively easy for other hackers to join the party and expand attacks to the general PC population. Most security experts consider drive-by attacks among the most dangerous of all threats, since they require only that users be duped into browsing to a malicious site or a legitimate site that’s been compromised.

HD Moore, the chief security officer of Rapid7 and the creator of the well-known Metasploit hacking toolkit, confirmed that drive-by attacks are feasible in some situations.

After additional testing and tweaking of an exploit that was added to Metasploit earlier this week, Moore said he was able to conduct drive-by attacks that leveraged the shortcut flaw. But there are some caveats, he said in several e-mailed replies to Computerworld‘s questions.

Microsoft gives up on the Kin, eyes Windows Phone 7

Less than two months after rolling out its Kin smartphones, Microsoft is giving up on the teen-friendly devices amid reportedly sluggish sales.

The decision, even as the company was hitting TV hard with ads promoting the phones, will allow Microsoft to shift resources from the Kin team to the upcoming Windows Phone 7 series.

“Microsoft has made the decision to focus on the Windows Phone 7 launch and will not ship KIN in Europe this fall as planned,” said a written statement from a Microsoft spokesman.

Teaming Kin staffers with Phone 7 staffers will allow “incorporating valuable ideas and technologies from KIN into future Windows Phone releases,” the statement said.

“We will continue to work with Verizon in the U.S. to sell current KIN phones.”

Just this weekend, Verizon — the Kin’s wireless provider — slashed prices on the two version of the phone, dropping the lower-end Kin One to $29 and the Kin Two from $99 to $49.

The move demonstrates the challenges Microsoft faces in gaining traction in the rapidly growing smartphone market. While Microsoft still dominates the PC software industry, it has watched rivals Apple and Google leap ahead in the mobile category with their popular iPhone and Android operating systems.

Announced on April 12, the Kin phones were designed for a “social generation.” They feature a touchscreen, a built-in Zune music player, integration with social media sites like Twitter and a visual time line that lets users view social media updates from their friends on multiple sites.

Content created on the phones is automatically saved and available, through cloud computing, on any Web browser.

Complaints about the phone centered on the cost of its mobile contract, which rivals that of more advanced devices like the iPhone and Android.

Microsoft is not releasing sales figures for the Kin, but multiple reports have said they were anemic, possibly falling short of 10,000. The iPhone 4, by contrast, sold 1.7 million units in its first three days.

Microsoft’s series of phones for the Windows 7 operating systems is expected out by this year’s holiday season.

Phones running the system will be made by companies like Qualcomm, Samsung, LG, HTC, HP, Dell, Sony Ericsson Toshiba, and Garmin-Asus, Microsoft has said.

Less than two months after rolling out its Kin smartphones, Microsoft is giving up on the teen-friendly devices amid reportedly sluggish sales.

The decision, even as the company was hitting TV hard with ads promoting the phones, will allow Microsoft to shift resources from the Kin team to the upcoming Windows Phone 7 series.

“Microsoft has made the decision to focus on the Windows Phone 7 launch and will not ship KIN in Europe this fall as planned,” said a written statement from a Microsoft spokesman.

Teaming Kin staffers with Phone 7 staffers will allow “incorporating valuable ideas and technologies from KIN into future Windows Phone releases,” the statement said.

“We will continue to work with Verizon in the U.S. to sell current KIN phones.”

Just this weekend, Verizon — the Kin’s wireless provider — slashed prices on the two version of the phone, dropping the lower-end Kin One to $29 and the Kin Two from $99 to $49.

The move demonstrates the challenges Microsoft faces in gaining traction in the rapidly growing smartphone market. While Microsoft still dominates the PC software industry, it has watched rivals Apple and Google leap ahead in the mobile category with their popular iPhone and Android operating systems.

Announced on April 12, the Kin phones were designed for a “social generation.” They feature a touchscreen, a built-in Zune music player, integration with social media sites like Twitter and a visual time line that lets users view social media updates from their friends on multiple sites.

Content created on the phones is automatically saved and available, through cloud computing, on any Web browser.

Complaints about the phone centered on the cost of its mobile contract, which rivals that of more advanced devices like the iPhone and Android.

Microsoft is not releasing sales figures for the Kin, but multiple reports have said they were anemic, possibly falling short of 10,000. The iPhone 4, by contrast, sold 1.7 million units in its first three days.

Microsoft’s series of phones for the Windows 7 operating systems is expected out by this year’s holiday season.

Phones running the system will be made by companies like Qualcomm, Samsung, LG, HTC, HP, Dell, Sony Ericsson Toshiba, and Garmin-Asus, Microsoft has said.